Tag Archives: Ghost Stories

Gag Me With a Spoon

On Sunday, November 13 at 7pm at Zeitgeist Teatro Zuccone in Duluth, MN, The Flounder Loren Niemi will tell a story for Gag Me With A Spoon. A celebration of stories, voices, and gestures, inspired by the long winters and disconnected summers of life in the North, it functions in the tangible world and welcomes all the narratives of its community, offering a fun and safe platform to tell stories of the human experience. You can expect an evening of tears and laughter, song and connection. This event is best for those 14+. Tickets are 7-15.00 sliding scale.

Telling Ghost Stories- In Person

October is always ripe for ghost stories and we are offering a single-session in-person workshop in Minneapolis to help you tell your favorite “ghost” stories. We will cover both the elements of a well crafted scary story and some tricks to make the telling of the same, all the scarier.

 


To register:

  1. Add the number of tickets you want by clicking the ‘+’ button
  2. Click the ‘Get Tickets’ button.

Telling Ghost Stories- Online

October is always ripe for ghost stories and we are offering a single-session virtual workshop to help you tell your favorite “ghost” stories. We will cover both the elements of a well crafted scary story and some tricks to make the telling of the same, all the scarier.


To register:

  1. Add the number of tickets you want by clicking the ‘+’ button
  2. Click the ‘Get Tickets’ button.

The Allure of Summer Camp Ghost Stories

by Loren Niemi – June 19, 2021

There is a story I tell about camping with the boy scouts in my youth. At one point after the meal of bacon, beans and burnt potatoes, the scoutmaster has us assembled around a fire and begins to tell us a series of ghost stories. Each is more horrible than the one that preceded it and I say, “If this is the place where the insane killer slaughtered all those boys, why are we here?”

His reply was, “Niemi, you just don’t get it, do you?”

But I did. Even then I realized two things about ghost stories told around the campfire. The first that no matter where you are, some dreadful spilling of blood and guts took place. The location doesn’t matter, the story doesn’t change. It is always supposed to make you look around wondering, WTF will happen next? The second thing is that these stories are only as scary as the audience’s willing participation. No matter how we ratchet up the BG&G (blood, guts & gore) if the campers are unwilling to suspend their disbelief, unwilling to see themselves in the situation, the stories cannot offer thrills and chills.

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